Hulkamania! 10 Beefy Factoids You Never Knew About Hulk Hogan

When most people think about pro wrestling, the numerous “federations” or “clans” and the crazy in-the-ring banter that commences before a fight gets under way, they generally all tend to think of one pro wrestler in general—a man who helped the sport become what it is today: Hulk Hogan. The much celebrated hulkster deucedly placed a remora of fear into his combatants time and time again in the rings, and starred in countless movies, including a reality TV show that was his most recent stint. However, we are about to reveal some few known factoids about wrestling’s most famous denizen, who dominated the “sport” for the better part of two decades.

Ten Beefy Factoids You Never Knew About Hulk Hogan
1. He was overweight as a child. You would never think that Mr. Muscle Man himself had a weight problem. But during his adolescence, Hogan struggled to keep trim. In fact, many considered him to be slightly obese, something that motivated him to hit the gym daily.
2. His cameo as “Thunderlips” in Rocky III consisted of this famous line: “To all my love slaves out there: Thunderlips is here. In the flesh, baby. The ultimate male versus… the ultimate meatball.” – He was paid $150,000 for that.
3. Before he was the Hulk … he was? Any guesses? His first wrestling character name was actually “The Super Destroyer.”
4. His first match took place on August 25th, 1977, where he fought one Don Serrano on the independent wrestling scene in Florida.
5. His real name is actually Terry Gene Bollea.
6. April 29th of 1985, Hogan would make history? Why? Because Terry Gene Bollea – ahem, Hulk Hogan – would be the first pro wrestler to grace the cover of Sports Illustrated Magazine.
7. In 1995, he released a best-selling kid’s record called “Hulk Rules.” He actually played the guitar on that record himself.
8. In 1985, he was a top pro athlete, raking in more than $10 million per year.
9. Richard Belzer sued Hogan for $5 million in 1985 because the wrestler made him pass out when he demonstrated a choke hold on him on Belzer’s TV show “Hot Properties.” They settled the case out of court.
10. He defended Vince McMahon in a famous steroid case in 1994, and many believe it is what kept McMahon out of prison.